Season 6. Amerigo Jr.

August 10, 2018 Leave a comment

Season 6. Amerigo Jr.

2018

Interesting and rare moments of everyday life of people in America South.

City Insight

Argentina: Buenos Aires

Brazil: Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo

Chile: Santiago

Peru: Cusco, Lima

 

Place Insight

Heritage: Easter Island, Machu Picchu

 

Season 1. Bonus.

City Insight

RussiaNizhny Novgorod, Pskov

 

Event Insight

Sport: Russia 2018 FIFA World Cup

 

Season 2. Bonus.

City Insight

Germany: IngolstadtMunich

Switzerland: Geneva, Lausanne

 

Event Insight

Aero: ILA Berlin Air Show 2018

Auto: Geneva International Motor Show 2018

Categories: Tourism

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August 5, 2018 Leave a comment

Smartly Institute

via Smart.ly Platform

05.08.2018

Online Educational Course “Marketing Fundamentals”

Certificate.pdf

Averages, Quartiles, and the Five Number Summary

Descriptive statistics: A way to quickly summarize data within a set using just a few numbers.
Mean: The average of a set calculated by adding all the values in the set and dividing by the number of values in the set.
Outlier: A value or values significantly higher or lower than the rest of the set that can skew the mean of a set.
Median: The middle value in a data set.
Mode: The value that appears most often in the set.
When a set has two modes it is called bimodal. When it has more than two modes, it is multimodal.
Standard deviation: A measurement of the amount of variation from the mean in a data set.
For example, if a data set has a mean of 50 units and a standard deviation of 20 units, we can conclude that most of the data will fall between 30 and 70 units.
Five number summary: The minimum, first quartile, median, third quartile, and maximum of a data set.
Each quartile represents 25% of the data within a set.
The first and third quartiles can be found by identifying the medians of the lower and upper halves of the data.
Range: The distance between the maximum and minimum.
Interquartile range (IQR): The distance between the third and first quartiles.

Graphical Organization

Boxplot: A graph representing the five number summary.
The boxed area represents the IQR with the median at the center.
Frequency distribution: A table that sorts data into equally-sized classes.
Frequency: The amount of data points that fall into each class.
Cumulative frequency: The running total of the frequencies.
Relative frequency: The frequency divided by the total number of data points.
Cumulative relative frequency: The running total of the relative frequencies.
Histogram: A frequency distribution shown in graph form.

Certificate

 

 

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August 4, 2018 Leave a comment

Smartly Institute

via Smart.ly Platform

04.08.2018

Online Educational Course “Marketing Fundamentals”

Certificate.pdf

Marketing Basics

Marketing: The process of creating, communicating, and delivering perceived value to customers.
Value: The practical and emotional benefits that the buyer of a product gets from it. Each benefit stems from a specific feature of the product.
Perceived value is the value that people believe they will receive from a product.
A product can be a tangible good, such as a pair of shoes, a service (e.g., a doctor’s check-up), or intellectual property (e.g., song lyrics).
Marketing strategy: A plan of what to sell, whom to sell it to, and how to sell it that is focused on long-term profit, rather than shortterm gains.

Conducting a Situation Analysis

Situation analysis: An evaluation of a company’s resources and capabilities, its competitors, and general market demand. A situation analysis consists of two tasks:
1. Examining the four C’s: company, competitors, customers, and collaborators.
2. Interpreting the information gathered in the four C’s within the framework of a SWOT analysis, which describes the company’s strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats.

Segmentation, Targeting, and Positioning

Segmentation, targeting, and positioning (STP): A process used to tailor marketing efforts to relevant audiences and thus ultimately maximize revenue.
Segmentation divides consumers into distinct groups, or segments, based on homogeneity in certain attributes, distinction in these attributes from customers in other segments, and a similar reaction to marketing messages.
Targeting is the process of selecting which segment(s) of consumers to focus marketing efforts on—i.e., the target audience.
Positioning defines how a company wants its product to be perceived by consumers it markets to, relative to competing products.

Value Propositions

The value proposition (VP) is:
1. The benefits that a product provides to the target audience.
2. A statement describing these benefits.
Unique selling proposition (USP): A type of value proposition statement that communicates the essence of what makes a product unique to the target audience.

The Four P’s

The four P’s—product, price, place, and promotion—constitute the marketing mix that a company must consider in order to create a marketing strategy. These four factors are under the company’s control: the company decides what product to offer, what price to charge for it, where to place it for sale, and how to promote it. The marketing mix needs to be adjusted over the course of the product life cycle as the types of customers who buy the product and the quantity of demand change.
Positioning statement: A statement describing the core benefits that a product offers, used internally to guide product messaging.

Certificate

 

 

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August 3, 2018 Leave a comment

Smartly Institute

via Smart.ly Platform

03.08.2018

Online Educational Course “Microeconomics 1: Supply and Demand”

Certificate.pdf

Introducing Microeconomics

Microeconomics: The study of how individuals, households, and firms make decisions about using limited resources.
Economic resources include:
Human resources: Workers and managers.
Nonhuman resources: Land, technology, minerals, oil, etc.
Microeconomists assume that people and firms are rational and seek to maximize benefits.
Trade-offs: Choosing one thing requires giving up another.
Scarcity: The existence of limited resources.
When an individual or group makes a decision, their opportunity cost is equal to the value of the foregone option(s).
Economic units: People, households, and firms.
Marginal benefits: Small, incremental benefits.

Supply and Demand

The law of demand: When the price of a good increases, demand for it decreases, and vice versa.
Demand schedule: Lists the quantity demanded of a product or service at various prices.
Market demand schedule: A demand schedule that encompasses the entire market’s demand for a good or service at various price points.
Demand curve (DC): Plots the quantity of a good or service demanded at different prices.
Market demand curve: Shows the market demand schedule.
When demand curves shift:
to the left—market demand has decreased.
to the right—market demand has increased.
Market price: The price at which a good or service is offered in the marketplace.
Law of supply: When the market price for a good increases, the quantity that suppliers produce and sell increases, and vice versa.
Supply schedule: Lists the quantity of a product supplied at various price points.
Supply curve (SC): Plots the supply schedule.
Market supply: The summation of all of the individual supplies of a good or service.
Market supply curve: Shows how the total quantity supplied of a good changes as its price changes.
When supply curves shift:
to the left—market supply has decreased.
to the right—market supply has increased.

Factors Contributing to Equilibrium

Equilibrium: When the amount of goods supplied is equal to the quantity demanded.
Equilibrium price: The price where equilibrium occurs ($9 on the chart).
Equilibrium quantity: The quantity where equilibrium occurs (400 on the chart).
Equilibrium point (EP): The point at which the equilibrium price is equal to the equilibrium quantity.
Price acts as a motivator:
When there is a low price for goods or services, consumers buy more and sellers supply less.
When there is a high price for goods or services, consumers buy less and sellers supply more.
Law of supply and demand: The price of any good will naturally adjust until market equilibrium is reached.
Supply > demand: There is a surplus. Prices will drop until equilibrium is met.
Demand > supply: There is a shortage. Prices will rise until equilibrium is met.
Supply = demand: The market has reached equilibrium.
To recognize events that alter equilibrium:
1. Identify a shift in the DC and/or the SC.
2. Determine if the curve(s) shift left or right.
3. Use a graph to see how the shifts change the EP.

Certificate

 

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August 2, 2018 Leave a comment

Smartly Institute

via Smart.ly Platform

02.08.2018

Online Educational Course “Accounting 1: Fundamentals”

Certificate.pdf

Introducing the Balance Sheet

All companies must follow a set of rules that standardizes the reporting and recording of their financial data.
While US companies follow Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP), companies in most other countries follow the International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS). The balance sheet gives a glimpse into the health and composition of a business.
Double-entry bookkeeping: A transaction requires at least two entries to keep the balance sheet balanced.
Dual-aspect concept: If there is a change in the total amount of assets, there needs to be a resulting change in liabilities, equity, or both.
Money-measurement concept: Only items expressed as monetary amounts can go on a balance sheet.
Entity: A business, company, or organization.
Entity concept: A business’ finances are separate from its owner’s finances.
Going-concern concept: Accounting assumes that an entity will operate indefinitely.

Assets, Liabilities, and Equity

Assets: Items owned and controlled by an entity, valuable to the entity, and acquired at a measurable cost.
Current assets are assets expected to be converted into cash or used up by the business within one year.
Accounts Receivable: Where a company records credit purchases by its customers. The company expects these customers to pay them in cash in the near future.
Inventory: Goods an entity intends to sell.
Prepaid Expenses: Monies paid in advance for pending expenses—for example, paying rent in advance. Noncurrent assets will not be used up or converted into cash for at least one year.
Property, Plant and Equipment (PP&E): Tangible assets that depreciate, or lose value, over time due to wear and tear.
Creditor: Anyone who lends money or extends credit.
Liabilities: Debts owed to outside entities (creditors) in return for borrowed goods, services, or monies.
Current Liabilities: Obligations that will be paid within one year.
Long-Term Liabilities: Obligations that won’t be paid until at least a year has passed.
Bank Loans (Bank Loan Payable) can be recorded under both current and long-term liabilities.
Accounts Payable: Obligatory monies owed by an entity for goods and services. The opposite of Accounts Receivable.
Estimated Tax Liability: The estimated amount of what will be due in taxes per year.
Equity: Money (capital) either supplied by equity investors or collected in the form of an entity’s retained earnings.
Paid-In Capital: Money supplied by investors.
Retained Earnings: Income generated by an entity’s successful operations that is reinvested in the entity.
Proprietorship: An entity with one sole owner and investor.

Account Types

T-accounts: Charts used to record increases and decreases of individual accounts found on the balance sheet.
Debits: Represent an increase in an asset but a decrease in a liability or equity.
Credits: Represent a decrease in an asset but an increase in a liabilty or equity.
Asset accounts will normally have debit balances. Liability & Equity accounts will normally have credit balances.
Two special equity accounts are Revenues and Expenses. Revenues are increases in equity and usually have a credit balance. Expenses are decreases in equity and usually have a debit balance. Revenues are debited and credited like other equity accounts, but Expenses are debited and credited like asset accounts.

Accounting Transactions

Income Statements are used to calculate net income.
Net Income: The difference between total revenues and total expenses.

Net Income = Total Revenues — Total Expenses

Balance Sheets record one point in history and show a company’s financial position. Income Statements measure a company’s financial performance over a period of time.
General Journal: The chronological record of every transaction. A journal uses the same rules as a T-account.
General Ledger: The collection of all T-accounts.
Revenues and Expenses are temporary accounts. At the end of a period they are closed out and their balances are transferred to the income statement. Other asset, liability, and equity accounts are permanent accounts. They are not closed out, and their balances are transferred to the balance sheet.

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August 1, 2018 Leave a comment

Smartly Institute

via Smart.ly Platform

01.08.2018

Online Educational Course “Finance: Time Value of Money”

Certificate.pdf

Present Value and Future Value

Time value of money: Money in the present is worth more than the same amount of money in the future.
Present value: The value of a sum of money today. Present value calculations move money backwards in time.
Future value: The value of a sum of money at a specific time in the future. Future value calculations move money forwards in time.

The Timeline

Timeline: A tool used for visualizing a time value of money scenario. The periods of a timeline must always be equal.
Inflows of cash are positive numbers and outflows of cash are negative numbers.

Compounding and Discounting

Compounding is the process used to move money forward in time:
Increases the value of a sum of money
Involves multiplication
Calculates future value

Discounting is the process used to move money backward in time:
Decreases the value of a sum of money
Involves division
Calculates present value

Net Present Value

Net present value (NPV): The difference between the present value of all benefits and present value of all costs of a particular investment.
Benefits are represented by cash inflows (positive).
Costs are represented by cash outflows (negative).
Net present value is represented by this equation:

NPV = PV(benefits) – PV(costs)

A positive NPV (inflows > outflows) is an indication that a firm should invest in a project.

Moving Money Over Time

To compare or combine cash flows, they must be moved forward or backward to the same point in time.

Certificate

Coursera: Georgia Institute of Technology

June 10, 2018 Leave a comment

Georgia Institute of Technology

via coursera.org Platform

10.06.2018

Online Educational Course “Supply Chain Principles“

This course will provide a solid understanding of what a supply chain is all about. The course:

– Provides an introduction to Supply Chain

– Leverages graphics to promote the Integrated Supply Chain model

– Emphasizes understanding the Extended Supply Chain

– Presents a holistic approach – Incorporating People, Process, and Technology

– Calls-out industry-specific supply chain

– Leverages discussions, videos, quizzes, and questions for consideration

– Provides awareness of career path opportunities

– Presents emerging and futuristic trends in supply chain and given that at GT we are focused on developing what’s next in the world, we include Discussion of emerging and futuristic trends in supply chain.

There is very little math involved in this course – so don’t worry at all about your math skills.

The course incorporates reading materials that were developed as part of a $24.5M TAACCCT grant awarded by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment and Training Administration to the LINCS in Supply Chain Management consortium.

This course is designed for a wide range of learners including:

– Individuals working in a supply chain domain interested in improving their knowledge of supply chain

– Individuals curious about pursuing a career in supply chain

– Students working or studying in an adjacent business field

– Seasoned professionals who may be moving to a new area of supply chain

– Hobbyists – seeking to learn more about the world around them